Education

McCormick Will Seek Legislation To Lower School Age

Aug 28, 2017

State superintendent Jennifer McCormick will push to make Hoosier children start attending school at a younger age in the upcoming General Assembly session.

She wants to lower the compulsory school age from 7- to 6-years-old.

It’s an effort that has stalled in the past even as Indiana is one of 16 states with a compulsory school age of 7 or older.

Indiana’s Republican majorities have not favored reducing the compulsory age or making kindergarten mandatory.

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick called for more accountability on charter schools and private schools using taxpayer-funded vouchers during a forum Saturday.

The first-term Republican schools chief says her department is “pushing back” against the state’s free-market style of school choice that lawmakers began approving in 2009. McCormick wants all schools receiving tax dollars to face the same academic and financial scrutiny as traditional public schools.

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick and two of her predecessors from both political parties will come together Saturday for a public forum on education.

The panel discussion Saturday in Indianapolis tackles a broad topic: “the future of Indiana public education in an era of privatization, declining budgets and increasing expectations”

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick will be joined by Glenda Ritz and Suellen Reed.

Discussion continues on how to overhaul high school graduation requirements to better prepare students for workforce and college.

A 2017 state law calls for rethinking different ways students can prove they are ready to graduate instead of the traditional end-of-course exams required to earn a diploma.

The Indiana Department of Education offered schoolchildren around the state an opportunity to view Monday’s solar eclipse through an instructional live stream.

The department partnered with an Indianapolis-area school district to provide a safe alternative to viewing the eclipse.

In Christy Overton’s fourth grade class on the west side of Indianapolis, the students are getting personalized instruction from their scientist in residence, Rick Crosslin.

Pages