manufacturing

Indiana manufacturers hope the 2018 legislative session will hone in on workforce and education reforms to help fill jobs.

The state’s top business sector wants lawmakers to realign $1 billion in existing workforce spending and create incentives to attract new workers.

The $130-billion merger of chemical and material manufacturing giants Dow and DuPont is now official, nearly two years after it was first announced.

In the next 18 months, the newly created DowDuPont will split into three businesses – for material sciences, specialty products and agricultural chemicals.

The agriculture division stands to affect Indiana the most. Dow AgroSciences has 1,500 workers in Indianapolis, and more at seed and chemical dealerships statewide.

An Indiana logistics council wants to better connect military veterans with advanced manufacturing jobs.

Conexus Indiana will partner with five big Indiana firms to run a new vet-focused jobs site that could eventually expand to other industries.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive, in Lafayette, is among those working with Conexus on the program, called INVets. Human resources manager Brad Rohrer says Subaru recruited veterans at Kentucky’s Fort Campbell during its last big hiring push.

Indiana’s manufacturing sector is regrouping after a legislative session they’d hoped would focus on workforce development.

While some advocates applaud the reform that did pass – geared toward using the career and technical education system to fix labor shortages – others say there’s a lot more work to be done.