Latinx

¿QPM? S3 EP 8: Adios and Recap

Jun 19, 2019

  Este es nuestro ultimo episode of season 3. This season was all about música. We talked about mental health, the border wall, voting, new and old Latino music, instruments and Racism and more.

We moved our hips to artistas como Making Movies, the Grammy-winning all-female Mariachi Flor de Toloache, Migrant Kids, Reggae prodigy Zion, and Appalatin.

¿QPM? S3 EP 5: An artist's mental health

May 8, 2019
Migrantkids.com

The month of May is Mental Health Awareness Month and what better way to create conciencia acerca de la estabilidad mental than to talk to an artist about how his journey to finding stability and balance within his mental health has taken him through dark moments and to seek professional help.

Alfonso Vidal

Why did Alfonso come to the Midwest? It had something to do with the FARC - las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia - una alianza en contra del gobierno since 1964. The FARC sustains their estilo de vida by kidnapping and ransom, illegal mining, extorsiones and the production and distribución of illegal drugs.

¿QPM? 3: Being Afro Latina en el Medio Oeste

Oct 18, 2017
Paola Marizan / WNIN

After Trump's election, Lydia got punched in the face at the mall because of her dark skin and afro-like hair.

  En este episodio, exploramos lo que significa identidad -we talk to Lydia about being Mexican and African American in the Midwest - dealing with the issues of Inmigración and racial profiling - and about the threats her father received after Trump’s election.

Featured music from Flor de Toloache - Mariachi Femenino when they came to our studio.

¿QPM? 2: Loyalty por la patria y la familia.

Oct 16, 2017
Grisel Barajas

Because Pedro is a U.S. citizen, he was able to sign up for eight years of service and in return, his parents can stay in this country after living undocumented for almost twenty years.

In the first three months, President Trump was in office, an average of over 5,000 immigrants a month were arrested and nearly 200,000 families were approved for Parole in Place, according to Homeland Security. Before 2013, members of the U.S. armed forces with undocumented families could leave for training or to fight in other countries and return a una casa vacía, to a deported family.