Science & Environment

Use Of Coal Down In Indiana

Nov 22, 2017

Electric utility rates for Hoosiers across Indiana are up, according to an annual report from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, the state agency that oversees electric and water utilities.

Indiana ranked 18th nationwide for electricity prices in 2016. That’s down from the fourth lowest in 2002. The report says multiple factors are responsible for the increase in price, including stricter environmental regulations and the changing cost of fuel.

Farmers Seek Delay For Hazardous Air Emission Rule

Nov 14, 2017

Chicken and hog farmers want a federal court to delay a rule that would require they report certain hazardous air emissions from manure pits, but Hoosier farmers aren’t sure how they’d comply with the rule if it goes into effect.

A federal court ruled last April farms were not exempt from a 2008 Environmental Protection Agency rule regulating hazardous air emissions. The ruling takes effect Nov. 15, but Indiana Pork Producers executive director Josh Trenary says the EPA and ag industry groups want a delay.

IU To Turn GHG Emissions Into Plant Fertilizer

Nov 13, 2017

Indiana University wants to improve its sustainability – and it’s turning to a novel way of recycling to do so. The school’s main campus will turn its greenhouse gas emissions into plant fertilizer with the help of a photobioreactor.

The machine is made out of PVC pipe and will sit on top of the university’s central heating plant. There, it will capture plant emissions, which will be used to feed algae, which project co-leader Chip Glaholt says will be turned into plant fertilizer.

What's The (Energy) Plan?

Nov 3, 2017

The Obama administration created the Clean Power Plan with the goal of reducing carbon emissions 30 percent nationwide. But the U.S. Supreme Court put that plan on hold after industry groups and 28 states, including Indiana, sued. And Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt recently took the first step to repeal the plan altogether.

Last Thursday, retired biologist Leslie Bishop delivered a letter with 228 signatures to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office. Bishop and other scientists say the state is logging too much and damaging a sensitive ecosystem.

“Animals, plants, shrubs, mosses, lichens, fungi, microbes, you know, the whole soil system all the way up to the tops of trees, there’s this incredible diversity of organisms,” Bishop says.

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