Law & Criminal Justice

A proposed traffic amnesty program would help Hoosiers pay back debts and reinstate suspended licenses. It could allow more than 400,000 Hoosiers to become legal, licensed drivers once again.

Nearly one in 10 Hoosiers have suspended licenses because of financial reasons – not safety violations – according a report from students at Indiana University.

Indiana’s judicial system is on track to achieve statewide electronic filing in all courts by early 2019 at the latest.

The state’s Supreme Court justices outlined the latest information from the court’s annual report Tuesday.

Seventy percent of all new cases statewide in the last year were filed through Odyssey, Indiana’s primary court data system. That’s up from 65 percent the year before.

A federal judge permanently struck down key portions of Indiana’s controversial 2016 anti-abortion bill.

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill announced Friday he will launch an investigation into the recent data breach at credit reporting agency Equifax.

The personal information of nearly 4 million Hoosiers was potentially exposed by the Equifax breach.

Indiana’s battle to collect online sales tax from businesses that don’t have a physical presence in the state will more likely play out in Congress than in the courts, says one economist.

Indiana does collect sales tax from companies such as Amazon, which has seven distribution centers across five counties.

But the state also wants to tax online retailers including Wayfair and Overstock, which don’t – but still earn more than $100,000 a year from Hoosiers.

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