Law & Criminal Justice

Guilty Plea in Falsified Mental Evaluation Case

Aug 8, 2017
AJ Casey / WNIN

Bloomington psychologist Dr. Albert Fink pleaded guilty to an obstruction of justice charge Tuesday afternoon. 

In a plea deal, Fink admitted to submitting false evidence in the Vanderburgh County trial of Caleb Loving last August. Fink was charged with obstruction of justice and theft. The theft charge was dismissed in the plea agreement.

The plea agreement included an eighteen month jail sentence that was suspended to probation and a $10,000 fine. Fink must also surrender his professional licenses.

IBM owes Indiana more than $78 million after it failed to deliver on its contract to privatize the state’s welfare system a decade ago. A county judge determined the final dollar amounts in a decision published Monday.

It comes after the Indiana Supreme Court ruled last year IBM had breached its $1.3 billion contract with then-Gov. Mitch Daniels’ administration.

State Exec. Branch To Stop Asking For Criminal History On Job Apps

Jun 29, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb says a range of state agencies will no longer ask job applicants if they have been arrested or convicted of a crime.

The executive order, issued Thursday, aims to give Hoosiers with criminal records more chances to become state employees.

Right now, applicants for state job openings have to self-report any criminal history.

Holcomb’s order says this can make it hard for people with records to “have productive lives because of the stigma of their past.”

The federal government continues to oppose intervention by a group of East Chicago, Indiana, residents, who are asking a U.S. District Court to give them a larger role in the clean up of their lead and arsenic contaminated neighborhood.

The East Chicago residents were first turned down in May by Magistrate Judge Paul Cherry.

He ruled, “This case was closed over two years ago. To allow [the residents] to intervene now…would be highly prejudicial to the parties, who have already negotiated, settled, and obtained judgement in this case.”

The $130 billion merger between Dow and DuPont received conditional federal approval Thursday.

The companies still have to address areas where the Department of Justice says they’ll have too big a market share, but those aren’t the areas that have Indiana farmers worried.

In approving the merger, the DOJ says Dow and DuPont have to relinquish control of a few assets – a chemical plant in Texas for Dow, and two of DuPont’s insecticide and herbicide brands.

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