Health & Wellness

Four Indiana counties that were in danger of having no insurance options for customers on the Affordable Care Act marketplace will have choices in 2018. Decatur, Jackson, Grant and Wayne Counties were at risk of having no providers next year after Anthem and MD Wise announced in June they would be leaving the market at the end of this year.

A new partnership aims to provide members of the Indiana National Guard with mental health and substance abuse care. Indiana National Guard behavioral health officer Maj. Scott Edwards says the program called “Mission Recovery,” tailored to service member’s needs.

“So when service members come they are meeting with a provider who understands more about the realities of being a military member,” Edwards says. “That’s hugely important for us and it’s key to the success in any kind of initiative where people come to get help for mental health or substance abuse problems.”

Study: Food Outlet Proximity Not Related To Obesity

Aug 14, 2017

Researchers say a new study on whether a person’s proximity to certain food options causes obesity sets itself apart from past projects.

The findings indicate policies to reduce the number of fast food places or even open more markets will not likely reduce obesity. Indiana University environmental affairs professor Coady Wing was part of a team of researchers involved in a recent study.

Hoosier Family Helps Push 'Right To Try' Nationally

Aug 10, 2017

A “Right To Try” bill that allows families to use prescription drugs that don’t have full FDA approval passed the U.S. Senate last week with unanimous support. U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) helped author the legislation, modeled after an Indiana state law, with encouragement from a Hoosier mother and her son.

Jordan McLinn, 8, became the face of Indiana’s “Right To Try” bill in 2015. Last year his mother, Laura McLinn, visited Donnelly to lobby for a federal version.

Diabetes educators from across the country are in Indianapolis for the annual American Association of Diabetes Educators to learn how to better reduce the widespread disease.

They come from all different backgrounds says local educator Jasmine Gonzalvo.

“We’re pharmacists, we’re physical therapists, we’re dieticians, we’re nurses,” Gonzalvo says. “Sometimes people don’t know about us, but as far as the wealth of resources we have to offer, we really should be at the forefront when you’re talking about helping a person with diabetes.”

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