Business & Economy

The $130-billion merger of chemical and material manufacturing giants Dow and DuPont is now official, nearly two years after it was first announced.

In the next 18 months, the newly created DowDuPont will split into three businesses – for material sciences, specialty products and agricultural chemicals.

The agriculture division stands to affect Indiana the most. Dow AgroSciences has 1,500 workers in Indianapolis, and more at seed and chemical dealerships statewide.

Indiana’s battle to collect online sales tax from businesses that don’t have a physical presence in the state will more likely play out in Congress than in the courts, says one economist.

Indiana does collect sales tax from companies such as Amazon, which has seven distribution centers across five counties.

But the state also wants to tax online retailers including Wayfair and Overstock, which don’t – but still earn more than $100,000 a year from Hoosiers.

The Indiana Farm Bureau will emphasize rural broadband and federal agriculture legislation in 2018.

The Indiana Farm Bureau lobbies for farmers all over the state; it also sells insurance. Delegates from all of Indiana’s 92 counties met at the end of August to determine the organizations policy positions for next year.

Katrina Hall, the farm bureau’s director of public policy, says without broadband internet access, farmers are working with one hand tied behind their back.

Ag Study Committee Talks CAFOs

Aug 29, 2017

In a meeting of the agriculture and natural resources study committee that featured very little new information, state lawmakers Tuesday heard from experts and state regulators on animal agriculture and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs).

Committee members heard an overview of the state’s CAFO permitting process from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

And CAFO legislation expert Carolyn Orr told legislators big farm operations aren’t necessarily bad ones.

The state of Indiana filed a lawsuit Monday to allow it to collect sales tax from online sellers who don’t have a presence in Indiana.

New state legislation that prompted the lawsuit means the state could collect those taxes if the courts rule in its favor.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1992 that online retailers don’t have to collect and remit sales tax if they have no physical connection to the state.

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