Workforce

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce emphasized education in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, in its plans for the 2018 legislative session. Chamber Vice President of Education, Workforce Development & Federal Relations, Caryl Auslander, says a major focus is on making computer science a prerequisite for high school graduation.

“While there are STEM requirements for high school graduation, there is not a computer science requirement,” Auslander says. “And we believe that needs to change.”


There’s widespread agreement among legislative leaders and the Holcomb administration that workforce development will be a principal focus of the 2018 legislative session. And that falls in line with the state Chamber of Commerce priorities outlined Monday.

Indiana manufacturers hope the 2018 legislative session will hone in on workforce and education reforms to help fill jobs.

The state’s top business sector wants lawmakers to realign $1 billion in existing workforce spending and create incentives to attract new workers.

Indiana workforce officials are convening dozens of groups of local education and business leaders across the state to improve training efforts for new workers.

It’s the next phase of the Indiana’s SkillUp program, which aims to help localize training efforts for the state’s estimated million job openings in the next decade.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce’s latest report card on the state economy’s race to the top shows some progress. But a lot of obstacles remain.

The Vision 2025 Plan is basically the Chamber’s policy platform. Chamber president Kevin Brinegar says it lays out the ways Indiana’s economy should succeed.

“We believe, if we can be best of class in each of these areas, that Indiana will have the best chance for competitiveness and prosperity in the 21st-century global economy,” he says.

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