Workforce

Ivy Tech Community College’s new strategic plan calls for more than doubling the number of degrees earned by students in the next five years.

Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann wants to boost certifications, certificates and degrees awarded statewide from about 21,000 to 50,000 annually by 2023.

She also wants to grow enrollment by more than 25 percent in the next five years from about 94,000 students to nearly 120,000 students.

To help reach that goal, the college is improving academic advising and offering eight-week classes to help recruit and retain students.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce emphasized education in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, in its plans for the 2018 legislative session. Chamber Vice President of Education, Workforce Development & Federal Relations, Caryl Auslander, says a major focus is on making computer science a prerequisite for high school graduation.

“While there are STEM requirements for high school graduation, there is not a computer science requirement,” Auslander says. “And we believe that needs to change.”


There’s widespread agreement among legislative leaders and the Holcomb administration that workforce development will be a principal focus of the 2018 legislative session. And that falls in line with the state Chamber of Commerce priorities outlined Monday.

Indiana manufacturers hope the 2018 legislative session will hone in on workforce and education reforms to help fill jobs.

The state’s top business sector wants lawmakers to realign $1 billion in existing workforce spending and create incentives to attract new workers.

Indiana workforce officials are convening dozens of groups of local education and business leaders across the state to improve training efforts for new workers.

It’s the next phase of the Indiana’s SkillUp program, which aims to help localize training efforts for the state’s estimated million job openings in the next decade.

Pages