Senator Todd Young

Senator Young Applauds End To Filibuster

Jan 22, 2018

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) applauded the 81 senators who approved a move Monday to re-open the government – this vote ended the filibuster, making way for a short-term spending bill through Feb. 8.

Young also expressed his frustration saying the shutdown was “an indictment” on senators who sought protection for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA recipients.

“Now I think, all parties, including the Democratic leaders, are prepared to negotiate in the coming weeks,” Young says.

He says this is a call to action for Congress.

U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly and Todd Young say they’re working to continue Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy as they try to spread his message of love and unity.

Attendance at the annual event to celebrate Dr. King’s life was perhaps a bit dampened by adverse weather outside. But speakers inside the Statehouse said that didn’t diminish the importance of their message. Sen. Young (R-Ind.) borrowed what he calls one of his favorite King phrases, saying we should all be “custodians of hope.”

A small group of demonstrators were turned away from U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.)’s Indianapolis office Tuesday as they sought to protest the GOP lawmaker’s vote on the Senate tax bill. They describe themselves as frustrated but undeterred.

The protest of Young’s vote on the tax overhaul was born out of a Facebook group discussion, says organizer Kendra Wilcox.

Indiana Senators Split On $1.4 Trillion Tax Bill

Dec 2, 2017

Indiana’s U.S. senators split on the landmark tax overhaul bill as the Senate voted overnight Saturday 51 to 49 to advance the measure.

The legislation lowers the corporate rate to 20 percent and – at least temporarily – lowers taxes for most individuals. It’s also expected to swell the deficit by $1.4 trillion over the next 10 years. And the average taxpayer ends up paying more over the next decade as most of the cuts expire.

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) met with federal Veterans Administration officials to discuss the long waits many veterans face to have claims processed, and says he wants to work directly with the office to make significant changes.

Young says the amount of time veterans have to wait for a claim to be processed is around two years and appeals take even longer.

“One veteran that we discussed today has been on appeal for almost 10 years,” he says.

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