midwest

¿QPM? 5: Undocumented sin saber. Finding DACA.

Dec 13, 2017
Mareea Thomas

Imagine establishing a life in a foreign country that then becomes home - mi casa- even more than where you come from. That’s how twenty one year old Laura Ayala feels.

See, Laura can navigate the city of Cincinnati easier than she can travel through the roads of Bogota, Colombia because she moved from Colombia when she was just four. . Cuando estaba cerca de graduarse de High School, empezó su busquedad for the best university.

¿QPM? 4: Cooking Sofrito en el Midwest

Dec 7, 2017
Mareea Thomas

Finding the ingredients to feel close to home is always a hassle. Here's my journey finding achiote for my Puertorican Sofrito in the Midwest, how that becomes part of my identity and why Latino-owned businesses it matters. 

¿QPM? 3: Being Afro Latina en el Medio Oeste

Oct 18, 2017
Paola Marizan / WNIN

After Trump's election, Lydia got punched in the face at the mall because of her dark skin and afro-like hair.

  En este episodio, exploramos lo que significa identidad -we talk to Lydia about being Mexican and African American in the Midwest - dealing with the issues of Inmigración and racial profiling - and about the threats her father received after Trump’s election.

Featured music from Flor de Toloache - Mariachi Femenino when they came to our studio.

¿QPM? 1: Pulque en América

May 3, 2017
Paola Marizan / WNIN, QPM

 

Pulque, an ancient Mexican drink, is milky, slightly foamy and somewhat viscous. The Aztecs made this drink by fermenting the nectar of a cactus plant, llamada Maguey, para curar todos los males. 

The drink of the gods is at least 2000 years old and is seen as a cultural resistance to today’s political divide by those from the native land of Pulque. 

Cass Herrington

This year, WNIN produced its first bilingual radio program, Nuestras Americas, and in the first episode, we previewed the music of Making Movies.

It’s a multicultural rock band, whose members are from Panama, Mexico and the United States. They’re based in the Midwest, and their latest album, “A la Deriva,” tells the story of immigrants’ struggles with identity and family in the U.S.

WNIN’s Cass Herrington sat down with the Panamanian-American band mates and brothers, Enrique and Diego Chi, to hear how they are weaving their cross-cultural heritage into their music.