Health

U.S. Senate Republicans released their version of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act Thursday and there was reaction from both sides of the aisle in Indiana.

The Senate’s health care bill is similar to the House version in that it would get rid of the ACA individual mandate to receive health care coverage, cut back on Medicaid spending, allow states to waive services, and defund Planned Parenthood.

More than two-thirds of people who are blind or visually impaired are unemployed. Technology to help them enter the workforce is rapidly developing and recent advances could help level the playing field for blind job seekers in Indiana.

Jim Durst has been the superintendent of the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for 26 years. He says students want to work when they leave – and they can do the job.

Indiana health insurers will file their 2018 rates this week for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace but uncertainty about the future of health care reform may play into price and availability for the roughly 150,000 Hoosiers in the system.

Beverly Knight is self-employed. She was able to have a double knee-surgery because she is covered under the ACA.  She’s worried about rate hikes.

“If President Trump’s plan to sabotage the ACA succeeds, and premiums skyrocket as many expect, hundreds of Hoosier families, including mine, will be devastated,” Knight says.

Terrell Harris spent two years in prison on a drug charge when his son was a toddler.

Now, he worries about the effects of that absence.

“I’ve noticed a change in my son because of me not being there and being incarcerated,” Harris says.

For little kids, having a parent gone “constantly puts them in a stressful situation,” Harris says. “They are wishing their dad was here.”

Hoosier Children's Health Lags Behind In Kids Count

Jun 13, 2017

Children in Indiana are falling behind in a number of health measures according to the latest data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The 2017 Kids Count Data Book looks at children’s well-being in four areas: family, economics, education and health. In the health category, Indiana fell to 35th in the nation, down four spots.

There was a significant increase in the number of teen and children deaths and an eleven percent increase in the number of homicides and suicides. Indiana Youth Institute President Tammi Silverman says some of those deaths are preventable.

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