Enviroment

Last Thursday, retired biologist Leslie Bishop delivered a letter with 228 signatures to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office. Bishop and other scientists say the state is logging too much and damaging a sensitive ecosystem.

“Animals, plants, shrubs, mosses, lichens, fungi, microbes, you know, the whole soil system all the way up to the tops of trees, there’s this incredible diversity of organisms,” Bishop says.

A legislative study committee focused on Indiana’s environmental issues declined to recommend any policy changes to the General Assembly Wednesday. The panel’s final hearing focused on problems related to the access and affordability of drinking water.

Despite the final report’s lack of recommendations, Sen. Ed Charbonneau (R-Valparaiso) says it does include a lot to, in his words, “mull over.”

CAFO Committee Finalizes Report To General Assembly

Oct 19, 2017

A legislative study committee opted Thursday to make limited recommendations to the General Assembly on concentrated animal feeding operations.

CAFOs are large barns that hold hundreds to thousands of animals and their manure. Critics say they diminish air and water quality.

The study committee’s report will recommend expanding public notice requirements for farmers seeking to build a CAFO, says committee chair Senator Sue Glick.

Indiana Receives Approval To Expand Lead Testing

Oct 18, 2017

Two Indiana state agencies received approval to use federal money to expand lead testing, particularly for low-income Hoosiers.

The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration will be able to use $3 million a year for the next five years to provide lead testing and prevention services.

Indiana Pork Producers and a Hancock County family farm took their Statehouse testimony to a hog barn this week. The group is worried lawmakers will put more regulations on animal agriculture.

The legislature is studying large animal farms this summer – barns that hold hundreds to thousands of animals. The larger ones are known as CAFOS.

Hill Farms is slightly smaller. Heather Hill says regulations have become stricter over the decades.

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